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Everybody lies : big data, new data, and what the Internet can tell us about who we really are

Author: Seth Stephens-Davidowitz; Steven Pinker
Publisher: [New York, NY] : Dey St., an imprint of William Morrow, [2017] ©2017
Edition/Format:   Print book : English : First editionView all editions and formats
Summary:
How much sex are people really having? How many Americans are actually racist? Is America experiencing a hidden back-alley abortion crisis? Can you game the stock market? Does violent entertainment increase the rate of violent crime? Do parents treat sons differently from daughters? How many people actually read the books they buy? In this work, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, a Harvard-trained economist, former Google  Read more...
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Details

Document Type: Book
All Authors / Contributors: Seth Stephens-Davidowitz; Steven Pinker
ISBN: 9780062390851 0062390856
OCLC Number: 985108386
Credits: Foreword written by Steven Pinker.
Description: xi, 338 pages : illustrations (some color), maps ; 22 cm
Contents: Introduction: The outlines of a revolution --
Your faulty gut --
Was Freud right? --
Data reimagined --
Digital truth serum --
Zooming in --
All the world's a lab --
Big data, big schmata? What it cannot do --
Mo data, mo problems? What we shouldn't do --
Conclusion: How many people finish books?
Responsibility: Seth Stephens-Davidowitz.

Abstract:

How much sex are people really having? How many Americans are actually racist? Is America experiencing a hidden back-alley abortion crisis? Can you game the stock market? Does violent entertainment increase the rate of violent crime? Do parents treat sons differently from daughters? How many people actually read the books they buy? In this work, Seth Stephens-Davidowitz, a Harvard-trained economist, former Google data scientist, and New York Times writer, argues that much of what we thought about people has been dead wrong. The reason? People lie, to friends, lovers, doctors, surveys -- and themselves. However, we no longer need to rely on what people tell us. New data from the internet -- the traces of information that billions of people leave on Google, social media, dating, and even pornography sites -- finally reveals the truth. By analyzing this digital goldmine, we can now learn what people really think, what they really want, and what they really do. Sometimes the new data will make you laugh out loud. Sometimes the new data will shock you. Sometimes the new data will deeply disturb you. But, always, this new data will make you think.
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Unsubstantiated Theorems

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